A difficult woman : the challenging life and times of Lillian Hellman / Alice Kessler-Harris.

By: Kessler-Harris, Alice [author]Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Bloomsbury Press, 2012Description: 439 pages : illustrations ; 25 cmISBN: 9781596913639 (hardback)Subject(s): Hellman, Lillian, 1905-1984 | Hellman, Lillian, 1905-1984 -- Political and social views | Dramatists, American -- 20th century -- Biography | BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Historical | BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / General | PERFORMING ARTS / Theater / GeneralDDC classification: 812/.52 | B LOC classification: PS 3515.E343 | Z74 2012Other classification: BIO006000 | BIO000000 | PER011000 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
1. Old-fashioned American traditions -- 2. A tough broad -- 3. A serious playwright -- 4. Politics without fear -- 5. An American Jew -- 6. The writer as moralist -- 7. A self-made woman -- 8. A known communist -- 9. The most dangerous hours -- 10. Liar, liar -- 11. Life after death.
Summary: "Lillian Hellman was a giant of twentieth-century letters and a groundbreaking figure as one of the most successful female playwrights on Broadway. Yet the author of The Little Foxes and Toys in the Attic is today remembered more as a toxic, bitter survivor and literary fabulist, the woman of whom Mary McCarthy said, "Every word she writes is a lie, including 'and' and 'the.'" In A Difficult Woman, renowned historian Alice Kessler-Harris undertakes a feat few would dare to attempt: a reclamation of a combative, controversial woman who straddled so many political and cultural fault lines of her time. Kessler-Harris renders Hellman's feisty wit and personality in all of its contradictions: as a non-Jewish Jew, a displaced Southerner, a passionate political voice without a party, an artist immersed in commerce, a sexually free woman who scorned much of the women's movement, a loyal friend whose trust was often betrayed, and a writer of memoirs who repeatedly questioned the possibility of achieving truth and doubted her memory. Hellman was a writer whose plays spoke the language of morality yet whose achievements foundered on accusations of mendacity. Above all else, she was a woman who made her way in a man's world. Kessler-Harris has crafted a nuanced life of Hellman, empathetic yet unsparing, that situates her in the varied contexts in which she moved, from New Orleans to Broadway to the hearing room of HUAC [House Un-American Activities Committee]." -- from Amazon.
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BOOKS BOOKS Niebyl-Proctor Marxist Library
General Stacks
PS 3515.E343 Z74 2012 (Browse shelf) Not For Loan NPML20080040

Includes bibliographical references (pages [361]-429) and index.

1. Old-fashioned American traditions -- 2. A tough broad -- 3. A serious playwright -- 4. Politics without fear -- 5. An American Jew -- 6. The writer as moralist -- 7. A self-made woman -- 8. A known communist -- 9. The most dangerous hours -- 10. Liar, liar -- 11. Life after death.

"Lillian Hellman was a giant of twentieth-century letters and a groundbreaking figure as one of the most successful female playwrights on Broadway. Yet the author of The Little Foxes and Toys in the Attic is today remembered more as a toxic, bitter survivor and literary fabulist, the woman of whom Mary McCarthy said, "Every word she writes is a lie, including 'and' and 'the.'" In A Difficult Woman, renowned historian Alice Kessler-Harris undertakes a feat few would dare to attempt: a reclamation of a combative, controversial woman who straddled so many political and cultural fault lines of her time. Kessler-Harris renders Hellman's feisty wit and personality in all of its contradictions: as a non-Jewish Jew, a displaced Southerner, a passionate political voice without a party, an artist immersed in commerce, a sexually free woman who scorned much of the women's movement, a loyal friend whose trust was often betrayed, and a writer of memoirs who repeatedly questioned the possibility of achieving truth and doubted her memory. Hellman was a writer whose plays spoke the language of morality yet whose achievements foundered on accusations of mendacity. Above all else, she was a woman who made her way in a man's world. Kessler-Harris has crafted a nuanced life of Hellman, empathetic yet unsparing, that situates her in the varied contexts in which she moved, from New Orleans to Broadway to the hearing room of HUAC [House Un-American Activities Committee]." -- from Amazon.

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