A Puerto Rican in New York, and other sketches / Jesus Colon.

By: Colon, Jesus, 1901- [author]Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Mainstream Publishers, 1961Description: 202 pages ; 23 cmISBN: 0405062184Subject(s): Puerto Ricans -- New York (State) -- New York | New York (N.Y.) -- Social life and customsDDC classification: 917.47/1/06687295 LOC classification: F 128.9.P85 | C64 1961Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
1. A voice through the window -- 2. My first literary venture -- 3. My first strike -- 4. The way to learn -- 5. Stowaway -- 6. Easy job, good wages -- 7. Two men with but one pair of pants -- 8. On the docks it was cold -- 9. I heard a man crying -- 10. Kipling and I -- 11. How to rent an apartment when you don't have any money -- 12. The day my father got lost -- 13. Hiawatha into Spanish -- 14. Name in Latin -- 15. A hero in the junk truck -- 16. Maceo -- 17. The story of Ana Roque -- 18. Pisagua -- 19. Rivera back in Mexico -- 20. Trujillo's fair of blood -- 21. Something to read -- 22. The origin of Latin American dances (according to the Madison Avenue boys) -- 23. Hollywood rewrites history -- 24. Chinese opera in Latin America -- 25. Jose -- 26. Sarah -- 27. Marcelino -- 28. Carmencita -- 29. The lady who lived near the statue of a man on a horse -- 30. Little things are big -- 31. The mother, the daughter, myself and all of us -- 32. Greetings from Washington -- 33. Because he spoke in Spanish -- 34. Youth: the Palisades as a backdrop -- 35. And Fuchik looked on confident -- 36. Wanted — a statue -- 37. The library looks at Puerto Ricans -- 38. On singing in the shower -- 39. How to know the Puerto Ricans -- 40. Soap box in the swamps -- 41. My private hall of fame -- 42. Books that never get returned -- 43. Reading in the bathtub -- 44. What shall I write about? -- 45. What d'ya read? -- 46. The visitor -- 47. Red roses for me -- 48. It happened one winter's night -- 49. "I made it" — "I sold it" — "I bought it" -- 50. Grandma, please don't come! -- 51. She actually pinched me! -- 52. Looking just a little forward -- 53. For the stay-at-homes -- 54. If instead of a professor -- 55. A Puerto Rican in New York.
Summary: "Jesus Colon has been active in the Puerto Rican community of New York City for more than forty years — always a passionate fighter and eloquent spokesman for the needs and aspirations of his people. Born in Puerto Rico in 1901, he has led a varied and colorful life, working on ships and in factories, as dockworker, dishwasher, postal worker and labor organizer. In 1923, he was a regular New York contributor to the Socialist newspaper, Justicia, published in Puerto Rico. In the late 1920s and continuing into the early thirties, he wrote for half a dozen Spanish-language papers published in New York. For many years, he was the head of thirty Spanish-speaking lodges of the International Workers Order, organizing Puerto Rican children's choral and dance groups, sports clubs, cultural and other activities. He was the American Labor Party candidate for New York State Senate, and later for the New York City Council." -- from the back cover.
List(s) this item appears in: Cataloged books (Erica)
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
BOOKS BOOKS Niebyl-Proctor Marxist Library
General Stacks
The Roscoe Proctor Collection F 128.9.P85 C64 1961 (Browse shelf) Not For Loan NPML20070013

1. A voice through the window -- 2. My first literary venture -- 3. My first strike -- 4. The way to learn -- 5. Stowaway -- 6. Easy job, good wages -- 7. Two men with but one pair of pants -- 8. On the docks it was cold -- 9. I heard a man crying -- 10. Kipling and I -- 11. How to rent an apartment when you don't have any money -- 12. The day my father got lost -- 13. Hiawatha into Spanish -- 14. Name in Latin -- 15. A hero in the junk truck -- 16. Maceo -- 17. The story of Ana Roque -- 18. Pisagua -- 19. Rivera back in Mexico -- 20. Trujillo's fair of blood -- 21. Something to read -- 22. The origin of Latin American dances (according to the Madison Avenue boys) -- 23. Hollywood rewrites history -- 24. Chinese opera in Latin America -- 25. Jose -- 26. Sarah -- 27. Marcelino -- 28. Carmencita -- 29. The lady who lived near the statue of a man on a horse -- 30. Little things are big -- 31. The mother, the daughter, myself and all of us -- 32. Greetings from Washington -- 33. Because he spoke in Spanish -- 34. Youth: the Palisades as a backdrop -- 35. And Fuchik looked on confident -- 36. Wanted — a statue -- 37. The library looks at Puerto Ricans -- 38. On singing in the shower -- 39. How to know the Puerto Ricans -- 40. Soap box in the swamps -- 41. My private hall of fame -- 42. Books that never get returned -- 43. Reading in the bathtub -- 44. What shall I write about? -- 45. What d'ya read? -- 46. The visitor -- 47. Red roses for me -- 48. It happened one winter's night -- 49. "I made it" — "I sold it" — "I bought it" -- 50. Grandma, please don't come! -- 51. She actually pinched me! -- 52. Looking just a little forward -- 53. For the stay-at-homes -- 54. If instead of a professor -- 55. A Puerto Rican in New York.

"Jesus Colon has been active in the Puerto Rican community of New York City for more than forty years — always a passionate fighter and eloquent spokesman for the needs and aspirations of his people. Born in Puerto Rico in 1901, he has led a varied and colorful life, working on ships and in factories, as dockworker, dishwasher, postal worker and labor organizer. In 1923, he was a regular New York contributor to the Socialist newspaper, Justicia, published in Puerto Rico. In the late 1920s and continuing into the early thirties, he wrote for half a dozen Spanish-language papers published in New York. For many years, he was the head of thirty Spanish-speaking lodges of the International Workers Order, organizing Puerto Rican children's choral and dance groups, sports clubs, cultural and other activities. He was the American Labor Party candidate for New York State Senate, and later for the New York City Council." -- from the back cover.

From the library of: Roscoe & Oleta Proctor.

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