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Economics : an introduction to traditional and radical views / E. K. Hunt ; Howard J. Sherman.

By: Hunt, E. K [author].
Contributor(s): Sherman, Howard J [author].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York, Hagerstown, San Francisco, London : Harper & Row, Publishers, c1978Edition: 3rd edition.Description: xxxii, 608 pages : graphs and charts ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0060430176.Subject(s): Economics | Capitalism -- history | Socialism -- historyDDC classification: 330 Online resources: Click here to access online
Partial contents:
Part one, Property and prophets: The evolution of economic institutions and ideologies : 1. The ideology of precapitalist Europe -- 2. The transition to early capitalism and the beginnings of the mercantilist view -- 3. The conflict in mercantilist thought -- 4. Classical liberalism and the triumph of industrial capitalism -- 5. Socialist protest amid the industrial revolution -- 6. Socialist protest: the economics of Marx -- 7. The rise of corporate capitalism and the defense of laissez-faire -- 8. The consolidation of monopoly power and the new Christian paternalist ethic -- 9. Economic prosperity and evolutionary socialism -- 10. Imperialism and revolutionary socialism -- 11. Keynesian economics and the Great Depression -- 12. Contemporary American capitalism and its defenders -- 13. Contemporary American capitalism and its radical critics.
Part two, Prices and poverty: an introduction to microeconomics : 14. Market allocation of resources: efficiency versus fairness -- 15. Prices and income: the neoclassical theory -- 16. The labor theory of value -- 17. Income distribution and the labor movement -- 18. Monopoly power -- 19. Profit maximization in alternative market structures -- 20. Government and inequality -- 21. Economics of discrimination.
Part three, Unemployment and inflation: an introduction to macroeconomics : 22. Aggregate problems: unemployment and inflation -- 23. The institutional setting -- 24. National income accounting: how to map the circulation of money and goods -- 25. Income determination -- 26. Consumption -- 27. Investment -- 28. Unemployment and business cycles -- 29. Government: welfare or warfare? -- 30. Money, banking, and monetary policy -- 31. Inflation and stagflation -- 32. Economic growth -- 33. Waste and pollution -- 34. International capitalist trade and finance -- 35. Economic underdevelopment: natural causes or imperialism?
Part four, Socialist economic systems: an introduction to comparative economics : 36. Varieties of socialism -- 37. Socialist development in Russia and China -- 38. Problems of socialist planning -- 39. Political and social problems under socialism
Summary: "This is about traditional and radical economics. It may surprise you to learn that there is no single truth in economics but, rather, two or more conflicting approaches to it. That is, however, the sad fact in economics and in all the other social sciences. In studying society there is no important point that is noncontroversial; on every important issue there are a range of opinions from the most conservative to the most radical." -- From the introduction.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Notes Date due Barcode
BOOKS BOOKS Niebyl-Proctor Marxist Library
General Stacks
The Roscoe Proctor Collection HB 171.5 .H83 1978 (Browse shelf) Not For Loan Contains highlighting. NPML19110032

Includes index.

Part one, Property and prophets: The evolution of economic institutions and ideologies : 1. The ideology of precapitalist Europe -- 2. The transition to early capitalism and the beginnings of the mercantilist view -- 3. The conflict in mercantilist thought -- 4. Classical liberalism and the triumph of industrial capitalism -- 5. Socialist protest amid the industrial revolution -- 6. Socialist protest: the economics of Marx -- 7. The rise of corporate capitalism and the defense of laissez-faire -- 8. The consolidation of monopoly power and the new Christian paternalist ethic -- 9. Economic prosperity and evolutionary socialism -- 10. Imperialism and revolutionary socialism -- 11. Keynesian economics and the Great Depression -- 12. Contemporary American capitalism and its defenders -- 13. Contemporary American capitalism and its radical critics.

Part two, Prices and poverty: an introduction to microeconomics : 14. Market allocation of resources: efficiency versus fairness -- 15. Prices and income: the neoclassical theory -- 16. The labor theory of value -- 17. Income distribution and the labor movement -- 18. Monopoly power -- 19. Profit maximization in alternative market structures -- 20. Government and inequality -- 21. Economics of discrimination.

Part three, Unemployment and inflation: an introduction to macroeconomics : 22. Aggregate problems: unemployment and inflation -- 23. The institutional setting -- 24. National income accounting: how to map the circulation of money and goods -- 25. Income determination -- 26. Consumption -- 27. Investment -- 28. Unemployment and business cycles -- 29. Government: welfare or warfare? -- 30. Money, banking, and monetary policy -- 31. Inflation and stagflation -- 32. Economic growth -- 33. Waste and pollution -- 34. International capitalist trade and finance -- 35. Economic underdevelopment: natural causes or imperialism?

Part four, Socialist economic systems: an introduction to comparative economics : 36. Varieties of socialism -- 37. Socialist development in Russia and China -- 38. Problems of socialist planning -- 39. Political and social problems under socialism

"This is about traditional and radical economics. It may surprise you to learn that there is no single truth in economics but, rather, two or more conflicting approaches to it. That is, however, the sad fact in economics and in all the other social sciences. In studying society there is no important point that is noncontroversial; on every important issue there are a range of opinions from the most conservative to the most radical." -- From the introduction.

From the library of: Roscoe & Oleta Proctor.

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