Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Capitalism and progress / Anna Rochester.

By: Rochester, Anna [author].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : International Publishers, 1945Description: 111 pages ; 21 cm.Subject(s): Capitalism | Economics | United States -- Economic conditionsDDC classification: 330.15
Contents:
Foreword -- I. Our roots in the past -- II. The nature of capitalism -- III. Producing for sale: What is value? -- IV. Workers produce more than they receive -- V. How surplus value is distributed -- VI. Accumulating capital -- VII. Crises -- VIII. Monopoly and imperialism -- IX. Fascism or democracy? -- X. The road ahead -- Reference notes -- Index.
Summary: "Capitalism developed without rational guidance as economic life became more complex and every man sought to satisfy his own individual interest without group regulation or control. It became a tremendous force for human progress, increasing the productivity of our labor, stimulating the pursuit of knowledge and scientific research, and laying the foundations for the broad human groups which we know as democratic nations. But at the same time, capitalism has included within itself serious inner contradictions and genuine conflicts of class interest." -- From the foreword.
List(s) this item appears in: Cataloged books (Erica)
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    Average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
BOOKS BOOKS Niebyl-Proctor Marxist Library
General Stacks
HC 103 .R6 1945 (Browse shelf) Not For Loan NPML19070030

Includes bibliographical references (p. 107-108) and index.

Foreword -- I. Our roots in the past -- II. The nature of capitalism -- III. Producing for sale: What is value? -- IV. Workers produce more than they receive -- V. How surplus value is distributed -- VI. Accumulating capital -- VII. Crises -- VIII. Monopoly and imperialism -- IX. Fascism or democracy? -- X. The road ahead -- Reference notes -- Index.

"Capitalism developed without rational guidance as economic life became more complex and every man sought to satisfy his own individual interest without group regulation or control. It became a tremendous force for human progress, increasing the productivity of our labor, stimulating the pursuit of knowledge and scientific research, and laying the foundations for the broad human groups which we know as democratic nations. But at the same time, capitalism has included within itself serious inner contradictions and genuine conflicts of class interest." -- From the foreword.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Powered by Koha